LAD 2014 Election

Laboratory Astrophysics Division Ballot 2014 - Voting Ends on 2 June, 2014 at 11:59 PM (Eastern Time Zone)

Instructions:

The following four candidates are running for two seats as a Member-at-Large of the LAD committee:

    Representing primarily in the area of Molecular Laboratory Astrophysics

  • Crystal Brogan
  • Karin Ingegerd Öberg
  • Representing primarily in the area of Nuclear and Particle Laboratory Astrophysics

  • Edward Brown
  • Michael Coleman Miller

Current time: Tuesday, 11 December 2018, 05:29:43 pm EST (-05:00 GMT)

Voting opened: Sunday, 27 April 2014, 11:59:59 am EDT (-04:00 GMT)
Voting closed: Monday, 2 June 2014, 11:59:59 pm EDT (-04:00 GMT)

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Member-at-Large

Description: Representing primarily in the area of Molecular Laboratory Astrophysics
Term Elected For: 3 years
Currently Serving:
  • John Black (Chalmers University of Technology)
  • Nancy Janet Chanover (New Mexico State University)
  • Gianfranco Vidali (Syracuse University)

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Crystal Brogan (Molecular Laboratory Astrophysics)


Biography

Professional Title/Position

Associate Tenured Astronomer, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Deputy Program Scientist North American ALMA Science Center, ALMA Subsystem Scientist for CASA (data reduction software)

Degrees and Education

  • Ph.D, Physics, University of Kentucky, 2000
  • B.A., Physics, James Madison University, 1993

Affiliations

  • Adjunct Faculty, University of Virginia Astronomy Department
  • American Astronomical Society
  • International Union of Radio Science

Research Areas, Topics, and Interests

  • Massive Star Formation
  • Triggered Star Formation
  • Super Star Cluster Formation
  • The Interstellar Medium
  • Supernova Remnants
  • Astronomical Magnetic Fields
  • Laboratory Astrophysics
  • Astrochemistry

Services, Roles, and Activities

  • Member, Virtual Astronomy Observatory Science Council, 2011-2013
  • Member, Astro2010 Program Prioritization Panel for Radio, Millimeter, and Submillimeter Astronomy, 2009-2010
  • Member, ALMA North American Science Advisory Committee 2005-2006
  • Reviewer (Grants), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant, European Research Council Consolidator Grant, NASA Origins, CONICYT ALMA Fund for Development of Chilean Astronomy, National Science Foundation - AST Radio Spectrum Management
  • Reviewer (Time Allocation), SOFIA, Spitzer, VLA/VLBA, JCMT, GMRT
  • Reviewer (Fellowships), Hubble Post-doctoral Fellowship, NASA Post-doctoral Fellowship, NAASC Post-doctoral Fellowship
  • Science Organizing Committees:
    • “Multiwavelength-surveys: Galaxy Formation and Evolution from the Early Universe to Today”, 2014
    • “The First Year of ALMA Science”, 2012
    • “Outflows, Winds and Jets: from Young Stars to Supermassive Black Holes”, 2012
    • “Building on New Worlds, New Horizons: New Science from Millimeter to Meter Wavelengths”, 2011
    • “From Data Cubes to Science: Ancillary Data and Advanced Tools for ALMA”, 2009
    • "Transformational Science with ALMA: The Birth and Feedback of Massive Stars Within and Beyond the Galaxy", 2008
    • “The Cosmic Agitator – Magnetic Fields in the Galaxy”, 2008
    • “Transformational Science with ALMA: Through Disks to Stars and Planets”, 2007
  • Referee: The Astronomical Journal, Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, The Astrophysical Journal, The Astrophysical Journal Supplemental Series, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Professional Experience and Positions

  • Associate Tenured Astronomer, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 2011-present
  • Associate Astronomer, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 2008-2011
  • Assistant Astronomer, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 2006-2008
  • Adjunct Professor of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 2006-present
  • James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Fellow, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2003-2006
  • Jansky Postdoctoral Fellow, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 2000-2003
  • Research Assistant, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 1996-2000
  • NASA/EPSCoR Kentucky Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellow, 1996-2000
  • National Radio Astronomy Observatory Graduate Summer Student, 1999
  • Teaching Assistant, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 1993-1996

Candidate Statement

Laboratory astrophysics underpins all aspects of astronomical research. From new rest frequencies for atomic and molecular species to improved collision and reaction rates, much of our research would be impossible, or at least stagnant, without an active and vibrant lab astrophysics community. This is particularly true if we are to harness the fantastic new discovery opportunities presented by new telescopes like ALMA and the JVLA, as well as the upcoming JWST, and SKA telescopes. Much of the new discovery space of these instruments lies in the spectral domain, directly through the potential identification of new astronomical species, and indirectly through the ability to make the detection of astronomical spectral lines truly diagnostic of physical conditions, chemistry, and 3-dimensional morphology. The creation of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) within the AAS represents a fantastic new opportunity to increase dialog between those already interested and working in this area, as well as educate the wider astronomical community about the important work and achievements ongoing in lab astrophysics. While I do not work in the area of laboratory astrophysics directly, its products and success are critical for my personal research, as well as the ultimate science productivity of ALMA (for which I am the deputy program scientist for North America). As a member of the LAD executive committee, I would strive to (1) increase the LAD membership; (2) educate the wider community of our efforts, offerings, and importance; (3) promote LAD to the public and funding agencies; and (4) in particular act as a bridge between the LAD and the ALMA users community.

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Karin Ingegerd Öberg (Molecular Laboratory Astrophysics)


Biography

Professional Title/Position

Assistant Professor, Department of Astronomy, Harvard University

Degrees and Education

  • Ph.D (cum laude), Leiden University, 2009
  • B.S. (cum laude), California Institute of Technology, 2005

Affiliations

  • American Astronomical Society
  • American Chemical Society

Research Areas, Topics, and Interests

  • Laboratory Astrophysics
  • Surface Science Experiments
  • Astrochemistry
  • Astrobiology
  • Radio Astronomy
  • Star and Planet Formation

Services, Roles, and Activities

  • Member of Scientific Organizing Committee of ‘Characterizing Planetary Systems across the HR Diagram’ 2014
  • Member of the ALMA Review Panel (ARP) 2013 – 2015
  • Member of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) time allocation committee 2013 – 2015
  • Proposal reviewer for ARP (French equivalent to NSF) 2013
  • Member of Scientific Organizing Committee of ‘Transformational Science with ALMA: the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems’ 2013
  • Member of ALMA North America Science Advisory Committee 2012 – 2015
  • Member of NRAO User Committee 2012 – 2015
  • Member of NASA Origins of Solar Systems Review Panel 2012
  • Member of Laboratory Astrophysics Panel of Department of Energy’s NNSA (National Nuclear Security Administration) ’Basic Research Directions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)’
  • Member of Scientific Organizing Committee of ‘NASA’s Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (LAW)’ 2010
  • Member of NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Review Panel 2010
  • Peer-review referee for Nature, Science, ApJ, A&A, MNRAS, PASJ, Physical Review Letters, J. Phys. Chem., Chemical Physics Letters, Chemical Reviews, and PCCP 2009 –

Professional Experience and Positions

  • Assistant Professor of Astronomy, Harvard University, 2013 – present
  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, 2012 – 2013
  • Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 2009 – 2012

Candidate Statement

A key feature of a vibrant laboratory astrophysics community is a strong connection to observational astronomy. I believe I am in very good position to help establishing such connections, since my own research, expertise and service work spans the fields of laboratory astrochemistry and radio astronomy. If elected to the LAD committee, I would work actively to establish stronger collaborations between different laboratory and observational communities, hopefully strengthening the impact of laboratory astrophysics on other fields of astronomy. A second goal of my candidature would be to help promoting junior researchers in this field. I believe I am quite aware of the challenges currently facing young laboratory astrophysicists in the U.S., and I would enjoy being part of the solution. This, I think, includes actively identifying and connecting young talents with the larger LAD community.

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Member-at-Large

Description: Representing primarily in the area of Nuclear and Particle Laboratory Astrophysics
Term Elected For: 3 years
Currently Serving:
  • John Black (Chalmers University of Technology)
  • Nancy Janet Chanover (New Mexico State University)
  • Gianfranco Vidali (Syracuse University)

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Edward Brown (Nuclear and Particle Laboratory Astrophysics)


Biography

Professional Title/Position

Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University

Degrees and Education

  • Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1999
  • M.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1996
  • B.S. summa cum laude, with distinction in physics, and with honors in the liberal arts, The Ohio State University, 1993

Affiliations

  • American Astronomical Society
  • American Physical Society
  • Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics

Research Areas, Topics, and Interests

  • Stellar astrophysics
  • Phenomenology of neutron stars and white dwarfs
  • Nucleosynthesis
  • Nuclear equation of state

Services, Roles, and Activities

  • Member, MESA council—oversees development of the open-source stellar evolution code MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics)
  • Member LOC, Chicago Conference on Thermonuclear Astrophysical Explosions, 2000, Chicago
  • Member LOC, Surface Compositions of Accreting Neutron Stars, 2003, Argonne National Laboratory
  • Member LOC, JINA Conference Frontiers in Nuclear Astrophysics 2005, East Lansing
  • Member LOC, JINA workshop on Classical Novae and Type Ia Supernovae, 2005, Santa Barbara
  • Member LOC, Nuclei in the Cosmos X, 2008, Mackinac Island
  • Co-orgranizer, Defining the Neutron Star Crust, 2009, Santa Fe
  • Co-organizer, Astrophysical Transients: Multi-messenger Probes of Nuclear Physics, 2011, Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle
  • International Advisory Committee, Nuclei in the Cosmos XII, 2012
  • International Advisory Committee, Nuclei in the Cosmos XIII, 2014
  • Member LOC, Type Ia Supernovae: progenitors, explosions, and cosmology, Chicago 2014
  • Panels reviews for NSF-AST, NSF-PHY, NASA/ATP, Chandra, NSERC, NWO (Netherlands equiv. of NSF), DOE-INCITE, DOE
  • External member, Ph. D. dissertation committee, Univ. Melbourne, Australia
  • Reviewer for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Astrophysical Journal, Canadian Journal of Physics, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Nuclear Physics A, Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, Science, Physical Review C, Physical Review
  • Textbook reviewer for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (2006); Norton (2010); Pearson Education (2011)

Professional Experience and Positions

  • Associate Professor, Michigan State University, 2010–present
  • Assistant Professor, Michigan State University, 2004–2010
  • Research Scientist, University of Chicago, 2002–2004
  • Research Associate and Enrico Fermi Fellow, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 1999–2002
  • Graduate Research Assistant, University of California, Berkeley, 1995–1999
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant, University of California, Berkeley, 1993–1994
  • Summer Research Assistant, Space Sciences Lab, University of California Berkley, 1993, 1994

Candidate Statement

Laboratory measurements of fundamental physical processes are crucial for interpreting and understanding astronomical observations. A vibrant AAS division serving as a forum to strengthen connections between these fields is essential for both to flourish. Indeed, my own research has benefitted enormously from the interdisciplinary NSF-funded Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), which has successfully enhanced the interactions between nuclear physicists and astronomers. My involvement with JINA and with the open source stellar evolution code MESA provides me with some perspective on the challenges in building this relationship: good versioning of data and codes, to enable reproducibility; long-term maintenance of data archives and community forums, to enable dissemination; and above all, ensuring that individual efforts are properly rewarded, to ensure that talented researchers are motivated to contribute. I feel that the LAD can serve as a forum for exchanging and promoting ideas on how best to meet these needs, and would like to help make that happen. In addition, I would like to strengthen ties with nuclear astrophysics, which is enjoying a resurgence of activity. As an example, construction is now underway on the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, which will enable experiments on many of the rare isotopes involved in nucleosynthesis. This facility, along with complementary efforts at other facililties, will greatly expand our understanding of the nuclear physics that power many astronomical phenomena. Now is a good time to make the research investments to take advantage of these coming opportunities. I feel that I can facilitate this by serving on the committee.

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Michael Coleman Miller (Nuclear and Particle Laboratory Astrophysics)


Biography

Professional Title/Position

Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland

Degrees and Education

  • Ph.D, California Institute of Technology, 1990
  • M.S., California Institute of Technology, 1986
  • B.S. (summa cum laude), Hillsdale College, 1984

Affiliations

  • American Astronomical Society
  • American Physical Society
  • International Astronomical Union

Research Areas, Topics, and Interests

  • Physics of dense matter
  • Physics in strong magnetic fields
  • General relativity and gravitational waves
  • Plasma physics
  • Black holes and neutron stars

Services, Roles, and Activities

  • Chair, LIGO Program Advisory Committee, 2012-2014
  • Member, Executive Committee of the Division of Astrophysics of the APS, 2012-2014
  • Member, Executive Committee of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the AAS, 2006-2009
  • Member of more than 10 scientific organizing committees for conferences and workshops
  • Referee for more than 100 papers, in journals such as Nature, Science, The Astrophysical Journal, Astronomy and Astrophysics, MNRAS, and Physical Review Letters
  • Member, Review Panels for NSF Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, Chandra X-ray Observatory, LIGO, Advanced LIGO, Compton GRO, Scholarly Studies Program of the Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Astro-E, Cooperative Grants Program of the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation, RXTE, US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, PPARC, NASA ATP, INCITE, NSF CREST Program, NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship, Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Professional Experience and Positions

  • Director, Joint Space-Science Institute, 2013-present
  • Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland, 2009
  • Associate Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland, 2004-2009
  • Assistant Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland, 1999-2004
  • Chair, Maryland Astronomy Center for Theory and Computation, 2004-2006
  • Research Scientist, University of Chicago, 1993-1999
  • Member of the AXAF Science Center, Chicago beta test site, 1997-1999
  • Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory Fellow, University of Chicago, 1994-1997
  • Visiting Scientist, Nordita, Copenhagen, 1993
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990-1993
  • Research Assistant, California Institute of Technology, 1985-1990
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow, California Institute of Technology, 1984-1997
  • Capacity Planning Analyst, Burroughs Corporation, 1984

Candidate Statement

Ever since the experiments of Fraunhofer revealed that spectral lines could tell us about the properties of objects too distant for direct analysis, fundamental physics studies in laboratories have been essential to advances in understanding of the cosmos. Such a matching of experiments and observations is currently critical in one of my specialties, the study of neutron stars, where laboratory measurements of light element binding energies and lead neutron skin thickness need to be combined with future X-ray observations of neutron star masses and radii and gravitational wave inference of neutron star tidal parameters to form a picture of the unique state of matter in the cores of neutron stars. As a member-at-large of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division I would enjoy doing my part to bring these communities together and also expanding my appreciation of the role that laboratory experiments can play in astrophysics.

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